People

Michael Colaresi

Michael Colaresi

Professor
Office: 346 S. Kedzie
Phone: 517-353-3281

Michael Colaresi (PhD, Indiana University, 2002) began teaching at MSU in the Fall of 2004. His research and teaching interests involve the the domestic politics of international conflict, the dynamics of conflict between rival states, and time series analysis. He has published two books, Scare Tactics: The Politics of International Rivalry (Syracuse University Press, 2005) and Strategic Rivalries in World Politics: Space, Position and Escalation (Cambridge University Press, 2008, with William R. Thompson and Karen Rasler), as well as a dozen refereed articles in journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, Political Analysis, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of Politics among others. His NSF-funded joint work on the statistical analysis of legislative speech with Burt Monroe, Kevin Quinn, Michael Crespin and Dragomir Radev won the Gosnell Prize for Excellence in Political Methodology from the Methodology section of American Political Science Association in 2006. His current projects explore the tension between national security-related secrecy and democratic accountability, the variation in legislative oversight on national security issues across democracies, the institutional causes of genocide and state failure, the statistical analysis of text, and the application of time series methodology to non-continuous data.

Recent Publications

  • Monroe, Burt, Michael Colaresi, and Kevin Quinn. Forthcoming. “Fightin’ Words: Lexical Feature Selection and Evaluation for Identifying the Content of Political Conflict.” Political Analysis.
  • Brandt, Patrick, Michael Colaresi and John Freeman. 2008. “The Dynamics of Reciprocity, Accountability, and Credibility.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 52(2): 343-374.
  • Colaresi, Michael and Sabine Carey. 2008. “To Kill or to Protect: Security Forces, Domestic Institutions and Genocide.” The Journal of Conflict Resolution 52(1): 39-67.
  • Colaresi, Michael. 2007. “The Benefit of the Doubt: Testing an Informational Theory of the Rally-Effect”. International Organization61(1): 99-144.
  • Colaresi, Michael and William R. Thompson. 2005. “Alliances, Arms Buildups and Recurrent Conflict: Testing a Steps-to-War Model.”Journal of Politics 67(2): 345-364.